Review: The Royal Treatment: A Natural Approach to Wildly Healthy Pets

I have no doubt that Dr. Barbara Royal is a fantastic veterinarian. She clearly embraces the best of both traditional and alternative treatment methods in order to help an animal's own body heal itself. I wish I lived near her and could bring my feline friends to her for treatment. Unfortunately, her book, The Royal Treatment, lacks the clear focus present in Dr. Royal's veterinary practice. It's a mashup of treatment philosophies, autobiographical storytelling and a few bits of very useful info. Some chapters are a single page while others are a little long-winded. All in all, the book could certainly benefit from a clearer objective.

From the subtitle, you might infer that this book was going to present a clear method that can help you to aid your pet in becoming the healthiest animal that she can be. I know I thought as much. But there isn't very much in the way of advice here, and what is here is mainly focused on dogs. Yes, there are a few sections devoted exclusively to cats, but they are few and far between. I'd estimate that less then 1/6 of the book is feline-centric.

The bulk of the 400 pages is a veterinary memoir. The stories are well-told and entertaining and I enjoyed Dr. Royal's writing style, but I wasn't particularly interested in reading her biography. I was more interested in learning about her care model. Her basic philosophy nis clearly communicated but much of her advice is presented anecdotally here in the form of stories. I'd personally prefer clear, species-specific advice even if it wasn't as entertaining to read.

The biggest problem I have with the book is the fact that much of the care advice given is written without a clear indication of exactly what species the advice applies to. This is a frequent occurrence in the book and an awful oversight for someone who is looking for help with caring for a particular kind of animal. It's clear that Dr. Royal likes all animals, but she loves dogs. In many cases where no species is mentioned, it's safe to assume she intends the advice for dog caregivers alone.

As a reader who is primarily interested in cats, I found this and a few of her offhanded cat criticisms a tiny bit off-putting. Not enough to hamper my enjoyment of the book, but disappointing because I hoped to actually learn something new that I could apply to my work here at KHD.

If you're looking for a good, non-fiction book to read for pleasure, I can certainly recommend this one. If you're looking for specific cat care content with a focus on holistic care, I'm afraid you'll need to look elsewhere.