Do Cats Have Baby Teeth?

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Biologically, cats are very different from humans, but they’re also very similar in a number of ways. Nicole L. writes:

I have two little five month old boys named Boba and Lando, and I found a little bloody baby tooth in Boba’s fur that I *think* came from Lando while playing but it is hard to check his mouth and know for sure. I think this is an age-appropriate milestone, my question is do they need any aftercare when losing teeth? Anything I should look for? Neither boy shows any discomfort.

Thank you for your question! Cats develop their first set of teeth when they’re around four weeks old. These teeth are relatively fragile, being smaller and less dense than adult teeth. They help to promote weaning since they irritate the mother during feeding. Then, around four to seven months of age, kittens begin losing their baby teeth as their adult teeth develop. The roots are often absorbed while the crowns fall out , but they can be so small that humans don’t even see them. It sounds like Boba and Lando are right on schedule. 

There isn't much you need to do. If you notice either of them rubbing their faces with a paw, you may want to put some crushed ice in a washcloth for them to chew on. It'll be a bit messy, but the cold will soothe their gums if they're bothering them. You should also make sure you're feeding them a pate-style wet food. All cats should be on wet-food diets, but it's especially important during teething. If they feel pain when they eat, they may connect the pain with the food and avoid eating altogether.

 
 

This is also a good time to get the kittens used to having their teeth brushed. A small, soft-bristle brush designed for cats along with a high-quality toothpaste or gel will help them to get many years of use out of their new adult teeth. We especially like Oxy-Fresh gel. Check with your vet for their recommendations.

It goes without saying, but Boba and Lando shouldn't be allowed to make any deals with Darth Vader for the time being. :)