Why is There Baggy Skin on My Cat's Belly?

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Cats have evolved in many ways to be fast and efficient predators. One of those highly evolved traits is very loose skin that allows cats greater flexibility and a greater ability to get away from other predators. But what about that extra skin that can be seen hanging off a cat's lower belly? Dan writes:

I have a male six month old kitty and lately I’ve notice his belly just in front of his rear legs is hanging down. When I have him lay on his back, I can feel what I’m hoping is fat but my five year old female cat doesn’t have it. I would have to describe it as looking and feeling like a fatty pouch. I hope that describes it correctly. Is this something to worry about?

Dan, it's very likely that what you're noticing is what's called a primordial pouch. Many cats have an apron of skin on their lower bellies that allows them greater flexibility when they run after prey. This skin flap actually allows their hind legs to extend further with each stride and give them greater speed. It's also theorized that it was a way for wild cats to store extra fat for times when food was scarce. Oftentimes, kittens have less of a skin "apron" than mature cats, but it does depend somewhat on the breed. It's easy to see this apron of extra skin on tigers and other large cats because of their size.

There's lots of misinformation out there about this flap of skin. Rest assured that it isn't related to gender or weight. It also has nothing to do with a cat being spayed or neutered. It's mostly related to breed.

If it feels like an unfrozen ice pack, Charlie is probably safe. If you feel harder lumps under the skin, you should probably have your veterinarian examine Charlie. Either way, you should probably mention your concern on your next vet visit.

We wish you and Charlie all the best!